Cooking with Kids: Kidstir and What’s in the Box

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Cooking with Kids, Kidstir, green parentingWithout a doubt, responsible and green parenting is a real challenge, and keeping kids on a healthy diet is a big part of it. From my own experience, getting kids involved in the kitchen is a good way to get them excited about the food we make and a more accessible means to have them enjoy nutritious meals without too much push and force. The earlier you start, the better. Our own Messy Kitchen: Cooking with Kids series explores this avenue with an open mind. The California-based company Kidstir takes it to a whole new level.

Kidstir is on a mission to spark a love of good food through the experience of preparing simple dishes together. Not every parent is a cooking enthusiast or has the time, imagination and patience to make cooking with kids exciting all the time. And that’s where Kidstir offers a helpful hand. How? With their monthly hands-on kits, kids get to build their own cookbooks, try new foods, and learn the fun stuff about where food actually comes from. And since every box is different, the excitement about “what’s in the box” this time, is like opening a birthday present every single month! Yes, there is a small price for each box, but think of it as an investment in your child’s health and education. The skills they will gain will last them a lifetime and the fun is endless.

So what’s in the box? let’s take a peak at a sample.
Cooking with kids, Kidstir, green parentingFrom the moment you open the mailing box and lift the lid, it looks like a very special present. Covered with green wrapping paper, the package unveils a Cookbook, (that each child can customize and arrange.) That’s where the fun starts. The rest of the package hides a variety of goodies buried in shredded crinkle paper, that’s needed for the recipes the box presents. For example, the “Snack Happy” box introduces recipes for a healthy yogurt dip, honey bear bars and fish food, and goodies include a kid-safe herb scissors, a small honey bear bottle and steel fish cookie cutters. This is enough to stir a child’s imagination. The questions start pouring in, so be ready to get started. But before you go shopping with the enclosed shopping list, your child can get busy with fun games and activities relating to the recipes or explore attached educational foodie pages.

Cooking with kids, Kidstir, green parentingKids love a “hands-on” experience. If they can touch it, stir it, mess with it, and then eat it, they’ll feel proud of being useful in the kitchen and they’ll eat their creations with a special delight. Plus having their own cook and work book will make them even more proud as they can later share it with friends, grandparents or schoolmates. What’s better than creative learning in the kitchen that is contagious?

To subscribe to Kidstir, go to Kidstir.com!

Recently, we did a fun little experiment- a Make your own pizza workshop, organized as part of a local farmer’s market. Although we didn’t expect much, the turn out was so overwhelming that we had to keep making pizza dough without waiting for it to rise just to satisfy all our little chefs. We had over 20 children ages 3 to 12. We gave each child a ball of pizza dough and let them have fun with it. Although most kids love conventional pizza, this one was made of whole-wheat, therefore it was drier and harder to eat, but most kids ate all their creations and asked for more. Even skeptical parents were grateful that we helped to introduce the kitchen fun to their child. Many parents were also amazed that their normally picky eater was all over the healthy pizza.

Kids’ involvement in the food-making process does make a huge difference in the way they view food.

And sometimes you have to just watch them turn your precious kitchen upside down, because if it’s not fun, they won’t do it again.

Cooking with kids, Kidstir, green parentingHappy and fun cooking!

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Author:Katka Konecna-Rivera

Katka Konecna-Rivera, co-founder and host of Living Green with Baby, is an architect focused on sustainable design as well as a filmmaker, writer and personal wellness coach.

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