Global Warming is Happening and Could Be Irreversible

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green architecture, emergency home

Photo courtesy of Andrew Rugge/archphoto

Our Thursday green news brings you the latest on green architecture, climate change, energy and communities:

  • Global warming is happening, and could be irreversible: According to a draft of a new international science report, global warming is happening and it’s increasingly more likely that the heating trend could be irreversible. The 127-page final draft of the United Nations’ Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change recently sent to world governments presents a harsh warning of global warming causes, what its effects can do to humans and the environment as well as what can be done about it. The reports describes: “Continued emission of greenhouse gases will cause further warming and long-lasting changes in all components of the climate system, increasing the likelihood of severe, pervasive and irreversible impacts for people and ecosystems.” The final report will be released after governments together with scientists review the draft version in all its details during the October conference in Copenhagen, Denmark.
  • New modular emergency housing prototype: Almost two years after Hurricane Sandy, there area still about 1,300 families living in temporary housing provided by the FEMA (Federal Emergency Management Agency). The need for disaster relief housing has become an important issue across the United States and many vulnerable cities are looking for safe and the most effective alternatives. While shipping containers have often been used as emergency housing, designers and architects are dealing with the challenge in their own way, trying to come up with a better solution in form of a modular housing. This new modular housing unit prototype designed by Garrison Architects, may be a better long-term strategy. As architect James Garrison explained: ” It’s this human element that makes modular housing better. Once you start doing certain kinds of things to shipping containers that they’re not really meant to do, from a structural or environmental standpoint, they no longer really serve that expedient purpose that they were chosen for in the first place.” Garrison’s emergency housing unit contains kitchen, storage area, bathroom and living area, and can be configured as a  one or three bedroom unit according to a family size. Both, its high energy efficiency ventilation systems (that can delay the need for air conditioning during hot summers) and its structure made from recyclable materials, make the unit very environmentally-friendly. And unlike the FEMA trailers used after Hurricane Katrina, this modular unit contains no formaldehyde in its wood work.
green architecture, emergency home

Photo courtesy of Andrew Rugge/archphoto

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