Have a Handful of Nuts a Day to Your Health

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Our Saturday green news bring you the latest on health, parenting and cool baby and kid products:health benefit of nuts

  • Have a handful of nuts a day to your health: Researchers at Harvard and Indiana University found that people who ate at least one serving of nuts per day had a twenty percent lower risk of death from many common health problems, compared to those who didn’t consume any. And even more so, people who consume nuts are less likely to be obese, or to smoke, and more likely to exercise, eat fruits and vegetables on a regular basis. The head researcher of this study Dr. Ying Bao pointed out: “Previous studies show benefits of nuts for different chronic diseases such as diabetes, metabolic syndrome, colon cancer and of course, heart disease.”
  • Exposure to phthalates linked to preterm births: According to a new study published in journal Jama Pediatrics, women who are exposed to phthalates during pregnancy have significantly higher chance of delivering their baby preterm. Phthalates are a hormone-mimicking group of chemicals used to make plastics more flexible and durable. They are common in personal-care products such as deodorants, shampoos, hair gels, nail polishes, and perfumes. Many canned and processed foods also contain phthalates. Based on this study, it’s highly recommended for pregnant women to opt for phthalate-free products to avoid the risk of preterm birth.
  • Children and deathly food allergies:  Based on data from the FARE organization, today one in every 13 children has a food allergy. The number of allergic and asthmatic children multiplied two to three times during the last decades of 20th century, and specifically food allergies continue to increase. According to Popular Science, today’s children aren’t spending enough time outdoors and aren’t getting enough natural vitamin D, which helps their immune system. Since their natural immunity can’t develop properly, their bodies aren’t capable to identify well harmless substances without overreacting to them. As Anne Muñoz-Furlong, CEO of the nonprofit Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis Network, noted: “Scientific progress, including hygiene and successful treatments for infections, has left children’s immune systems with little to do, so they go looking for things to attack. As Live Science puts it, they’re bored.”
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